doer receiver

Doer and Receiver (Active and Passive Voices)

Doers and receivers play very important roles in the Tagalog language. They are not necessarily always the same as subject and object. Doers are not always subjects while receivers are not always the objects. In fact, in a sentence, the subject can be a receiver while the doer can be the object. In the English…

question words

Question Words

What – Ano e.g. “Ano ang pangalan mo?” (What is your name?) “Ano ang ginagawa niya?” (What is he/she doing?) Who – Sino e.g. “Sino ka ba?” (Who are you?) “Sino ba ang bagong guro?” (Who is the new teacher?) Whose – Kanino e.g. “Kanino ang kotse ito?” (Whose car is this?) “Kaninong bayad ito?”…

ang & ng

Subject (Ang) and Object (Ng) particles

Subject – the noun or pronoun that is the focus of the sentence Object – the noun or pronoun which the subject is acting upon In English, the subject is usually always the first noun or pronoun of a sentence. E.g. The boy ate the apple. ——-(S)         (V)         (O) As you can see, the…

Basic sentence structure

For English speakers, as well as speakers of most European languages would know that the sentence structure of those languages is mainly. Subject – Verb – Object I (Subject) am (verb) a man (object). In Tagalog however, one needs to become accustomed to the structure when he/she practises the language. The sentence structure is not…

pronouns

Pronouns

There are three groups of pronouns in Tagalog for different purposes. E.g. I love you. You love me. (NOT You love I.) My friend and I. (NOT My friend and me. NOR Me and my friend. Although conversational.) Just like languages like English, French or German, there are different names for pronouns depending on whether…